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 During her residency artist Catalina Bauer (Chile) developed her ongoing project Lapso, conducting a series of experiments, interventions and collective experiences. Previously exhibited in Santiago, Chile and Sao Paulo, Brazil, Lapso is a site-specific installation that transforms and adapts responding to its different contexts. In London, Bauer’s deliberate use of colour pencils played with formal approaches to learning and teaching colour theory. As each Lapso drawing developed, reinterpreted colour wheels gradually began to evolve; a process subtly highlighted when the work was produced on site at St John the Divine Primary School’s art studio where it remains installed.

Using a deceptively simple process of drawing multiple circles directly onto the walls of both the gallery at Gasworks and the school, Bauer invited individuals to contribute to this collective experience. These interventions explored durational processes of making, multiple authorship and differing notions of ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ mark making. Each person’s participation in the process and the action of drawing each circle became an important and significant gesture. ‘This drawing is on the wall, but also is happening in your mind. It’s very simple, but makes me think of a lot of things’.

Lapso highlights Bauer’s preoccupation with everyday rhythms and routines as she considers how the patterns of her daily actions seep into her practice. “I try to do my work as well as I try to do my other duties in life, so I include art in my daily routine”. Lapso also continues an interest in producing work as part of a collective approach that has previously seen Bauer collaborate with knitting groups in Santiago, Chile and her ongoing work with the artist collective BLOC.

 During her residency artist Catalina Bauer (Chile) developed her ongoing project Lapso, conducting a series of experiments, interventions and collective experiences. Previously exhibited in Santiago, Chile and Sao Paulo, Brazil, Lapso is a site-specific installation that transforms and adapts responding to its different contexts. In London, Bauer’s deliberate use of colour pencils played with formal approaches to learning and teaching colour theory. As each Lapso drawing developed, reinterpreted colour wheels gradually began to evolve; a process subtly highlighted when the work was produced on site at St John the Divine Primary School’s art studio where it remains installed.

Using a deceptively simple process of drawing multiple circles directly onto the walls of both the gallery at Gasworks and the school, Bauer invited individuals to contribute to this collective experience. These interventions explored durational processes of making, multiple authorship and differing notions of ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ mark making. Each person’s participation in the process and the action of drawing each circle became an important and significant gesture. ‘This drawing is on the wall, but also is happening in your mind. It’s very simple, but makes me think of a lot of things’.

Lapso highlights Bauer’s preoccupation with everyday rhythms and routines as she considers how the patterns of her daily actions seep into her practice. “I try to do my work as well as I try to do my other duties in life, so I include art in my daily routine”. Lapso also continues an interest in producing work as part of a collective approach that has previously seen Bauer collaborate with knitting groups in Santiago, Chile and her ongoing work with the artist collective BLOC.