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Milton George

Grey Environment, Red Mind was the first one-person exhibition in the IK by the leading Jamaican artists, Milton George. All the paintings shown were made during Milton's three month residency at Gasworks Studios. Milton's residency was scheduled to coincide with the exhibition New World Imagery: Contemporary Jamaican Art which included his work and toured major UK venues during 1996.

Reviews of Grey Environment, Red Mind included the following comments:
"Looking at George's paintings, you become immersed in his life. (They) tell stories of cross-cultural journeys, erotic encounters, sexual politics and meetings with familiar spirits. If there is such a person as an artist-griot, a person who uses canvas and paint the way a griot uses song, then that person is Milton George."
Denrele Ogunwa, West Africa

"Each picture takes time to emerge, the colour is mute. They reveal a visitor's overview of Britain in a style more reminiscent than is usual for this artist of what is called 'intuitive art' in Jamaica. A 'Black Queen Elizabeth' sits in glory with white swans at her feet, while 'Transvestite' weaves together figurative imagery and narrative lettering".
Sacha Craddock, The Times

Milton George

Grey Environment, Red Mind was the first one-person exhibition in the IK by the leading Jamaican artists, Milton George. All the paintings shown were made during Milton's three month residency at Gasworks Studios. Milton's residency was scheduled to coincide with the exhibition New World Imagery: Contemporary Jamaican Art which included his work and toured major UK venues during 1996.

Reviews of Grey Environment, Red Mind included the following comments:
"Looking at George's paintings, you become immersed in his life. (They) tell stories of cross-cultural journeys, erotic encounters, sexual politics and meetings with familiar spirits. If there is such a person as an artist-griot, a person who uses canvas and paint the way a griot uses song, then that person is Milton George."
Denrele Ogunwa, West Africa

"Each picture takes time to emerge, the colour is mute. They reveal a visitor's overview of Britain in a style more reminiscent than is usual for this artist of what is called 'intuitive art' in Jamaica. A 'Black Queen Elizabeth' sits in glory with white swans at her feet, while 'Transvestite' weaves together figurative imagery and narrative lettering".
Sacha Craddock, The Times